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The Power in Wondering

We all wonder. We wonder about the future and what it holds for us and for our loved ones. We wonder about our careers, our relationships, and our contributions to our community.  Some of us wonder about accessibility:  As a parent, how do I know if my son will be able to access the curriculum in school if he is overwhelmed with sound and light? As an individual with a disability, how do I know if I’m receiving the funding that I’m eligible for?  As an employer, how can I be sure I am accommodating the needs of my employees? Some of us wonder about education and work: Will my child be able to sit through a day of school?  Will I be able to find a job that suits my skills and understands my needs? Some of us wonder about daily living and connections with others:  Will my daughter be able to live independently? Will I be able to make friends? We wonder, and sometimes we worry. Yet with support, we keep moving forward.

 

For individuals with disabilities, wondering about the unknown can be scary.

We need to advocate and research to find and create our own possibilities. We want to give ourselves and our family members the best options in life. But we don’t need to go at it alone. When we have people in our corner and knowledge at our fingertips, wondering takes on new meaning. It feels less isolating and more optimistic.

 

Exceptional Lives provides free, easy to use resources for individuals with disabilities, their caregivers, and the professionals who work with them.

Born from the lived experiences of its founders and contributors, Exceptional Lives seeks to close the information gap and empower parents and individuals.  The Exceptional Lives staff are doing the work for us: researching and making the calls, helping us connect to our communities.  As a mom with appointments, meetings, and a to do list that is 8 feet long, I’ll take it!

 

So what are you wondering about?

Getting special education services from school? Whether you’re eligible for a Medicaid Waiver? How to apply for SSI benefits?  If any of these questions sound familiar, our Guides will walk you through each process and give you personalized information that applies to you or your child.

 

Our How-To Guides are written in plain language, which means we use wording that is easy to read and understand.

We have plenty of graphics and additional resources to make sure you are getting the information you need. You’ll get a personalized checklist of action items based on your answers to questions we ask at the beginning of each Guide. The Guides also save your progress, so you can come back and update your information or finish the Guide at any time, on any web-connected device.

 

Maybe you know what you need, but you need help finding it.

You need to know what is available and where, and if it’s covered by insurance. Exceptional Lives can help with that, too! Searching on the Exceptional Lives free online Resource Directory will also provide you with a printable resource list and visual map to show you your options. When we have options, we have power. We can take the information at hand and make the best decisions for ourselves and for our families.

 

It is a beautiful thing to wonder.

As technology evolves, we have more opportunities to not only wonder but also connect with each other, our community, and available services and supports. We will continue to build relationships and gather knowledge.  Together, we are better prepared to help each other push the limits of what is possible.

 
Start using our Massachusetts How-to Guides
 
Start using our Louisiana How-to Guides
 

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