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Texas, On-DemandCalifornia, 2/29
Exceptional Lives Community Member
on
November 30, 2022

Prepare your child for the workforce with job skills training for young adults with disabilities.

What job skills do employers look for? Prepare your child for the workforce with job skills training for young adults with disabilities.

Jaleesa Alexander, M. Ed.
ESS Inclusion Teacher
East Baton Rouge School District

What job skills do employers look for? Prepare your child for the workforce with job skills training for young adults with disabilities.

Transcript:

Hey everyone.

I just want to give you a quick synopsis. The three skills that employers hone in on when students, especially those with disabilities, are trying to get a job or maintain a job, especially after exiting high school, are gonna be your self-manageable skills, your transferable skills, and your job-related skills.

These categories of skills are very important to the student getting the desired job that they want.

Self-manageable skills, those are those skills that say, Hey, I can manage myself. Am I respectful? Am I dependable? Am I on time?

Transferable skills, I learned these skills at one job, but I can take them with me to another job. So if you’re good with your hands, you may have been a waiter, a waitress, but now you want to try working at a library as an organizer or sorter. Those things are helpful.

Also, job-related skills, self-explanatory. Those job-related skills mean these are the skills that’s needed for this job, and I have ’em.

There are some things that you should do when trying to either maintain the skills that you already have or to gain more skills.

One, research. What is it that I need in order to get the job that I desire?

Do I need to know how to count money?

Do I need to know how to time-manage?

Do I need to know how to be a team player?

Those skills are all skills that can and will be required for most jobs.

Also, make a list of the skills you already have in comparison to the skills that you may need, and then finally, be able to talk about those skills. When you go on an interview, they want to hear from you. They want to know why you are the person for this job.

Parents, guardians, supporters, advocates, help our students to learn more about themselves, hone in on those skills and find those things that they can be great at.

Thanks.

Learn more:

Transition to adulthood for young adults with disabilities: a timeline

Life after the IEP: How do I help my child with a disability transition to adulthood?

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