844-354-1212

Webinar alert! Strategies for Communicating with Special Education Families

Texas, On-DemandCalifornia, 2/29
Exceptional Lives Community Member
on
December 7, 2022

One Quick Question: How can the school help if my child is having trouble reading?

If your child is having trouble reading, their school can help. Watch this video to see how.

 

Click to Read Transcript

Hi, my name is Darlika Boines. I am a parent and an educator. I would like to thank Exceptional Lives for allowing me to be a part of this project.

The first question I have is “What can schools do to help my child if they are having trouble reading?”

The first thing is the school has to have a multi-tiered supportive system in place. With this system the school can find out all different types of data on your child. The main data that they are looking for is your child’s reading levell. Once they have discovered your child’s reading level, they can use this information for the response to the intervention model, also known as the RTI model. With this model, students will receive, or your child will receive, intervention based on their tier. Tier one, tier two or tier three. But the key to ensuring that this model is done with fidelity, schools must make sure that teachers receive proper professional development on each type of intervention. And they must receive coaching to ensure that they are completing the interventions correctly.

The next question was, “How can I work well with the school to make sure that my child makes progress in reading?”

The first thing that you must do is establish a reading routine. Hint, every day at a certain time, try to read a book with your child, just to make sure that you are actually listening to your child read out loud that you’re hearing the phonics, the pronunciation. The next thing is you can also discuss with the teacher so you can know any type of assessment that they are completing at the school. Therefore, you will know any type of interventions that you can do at home with the child. Lastly, make sure that you have learning activities around the house around reading, that is fun. For instance, you can read recipes with your child. You can read the newspaper with your child. You can take a walk and read the stop signs with your child.

I thank you for your time.

Thanks for watching

 

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