844-354-1212

Webinar alert! Strategies for Communicating with Special Education Families

Texas, On-DemandCalifornia, 2/29
Julie McIsaac
on
February 6, 2019

Understanding Your Child’s Strengths and Challenges

No one knows your child better than you! This is why you are key to finding the right supports and activities that are most likely to help your child thrive. But it can still take effort to make sure that you understand how their disability affects them. The better you understand this, the better you…

No one knows your child better than you! This is why you are key to finding the right supports and activities that are most likely to help your child thrive. But it can still take effort to make sure that you understand how their disability affects them. The better you understand this, the better you can help them navigate their environment with less stress, and learn new things more easily.

Look for your child’s strengths

All kids have strengths! Find the things your child does well and encourage those activities! Praise them and help them know that they do these things well. 

Know what’s hard for them

Kids and adults with certain disabilities like autism may have a hard time with certain skills and situations. Does your child have trouble with social interactions? Do they get upset when something unexpected happens? Do they have trouble communicating, moving around or using their hands? If you know what they have trouble with, you can help them to get the right kind of support.It can be helpful to record these things. You can reference your notes when talking with doctors, therapists or people evaluating your child. You could also use your phone to take photos or videos. Gathering and reviewing photos, videos, or notes often allows us to identify patterns of behavior and may even help us better understand our child and his or her disability. 

  • Julie McIsaac, Ph.D.

    Child Development and Disability Advisor

    Julie specializes in working with children and families with diverse developmental profiles She uses reflective practice, emotion-coaching, play and a relationship-based framework to support skill building in the areas of emotional-regulation and problem-solving. Julie consults with families, schools and community organizations. As a parent, she understands the need to have a cohesive team supporting a child and family.

    Profile Photo of Julie McIsaac
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